Pumpkin Mascarpone Ravioli

pumpkin-mascarpone-ravioli

 
I know what you’re thinking…this is just another obligatory pumpkin post. The second fall hits, posts like these starting running rampant across the blogosphere. And to that, I would have to agree. Yes, it is another pumpkin post, but I promise it’s one you don’t want to miss!

 

This is the pumpkin recipe you should be making this fall. Not only is it an incredibly toasty, comforting, and delicious dish, but it’s also deceptively easy. The trick here (one of my favorite cooking tips of all time) is the use of won ton wrappers in lieu of pasta sheets. This makes the task of ravioli making super simple, since they’re already made and easy to handle. Also, once cooked, they are so delicate and tender…you’ll never want to use pasta sheets again.
pumpkin-ravioli-ingredients
 
Using a piping bag makes the job of filling the ravioli much easier. If you’ve never worked with piping bags before, I highly recommend them as a kitchen staple. Investing in a few good piping tips comes in very handy for a job like this, or other tasks, like frosting cupcakes. Of course, as always, if you’d rather not invest in the piping bag and tips, a large plastic bag with the corner snipped off will work perfectly fine as well.
 
pumpkin-ravioli-filling
 
When sealing the ravioli, be sure to wet the entire edge of the wonton square, and gently press out excess air as you seal the second wonton square on top. 
 
pumpkin-ravioli

ravioli-sage
 
Pumpkin Mascarpone Ravioli
 
You’ll need:
  • 1 can pumpkin puree
  • 1/2 cup mascarpone cheese
  • 1/4 cup parmesan cheese, plus 1/4 cup for garnishing
  • 1 teaspoon honey
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon pepper
  • 1 package wonton wrappers (about 50)
  • 1 stick of butter
  • 25 small sage leaves
To prepare:
  1. Prepare the filling by combining the pumpkin puree, mascarpone, parmesan cheese, honey, salt and pepper. Mix thouroughly.
  2. Add the filling to a pastry bag, fitted with a wide pastry tip. (If you don’t have a pastry bag, use a large plastic bag, and snip off one corner).
  3. On a flat surface, lay out half of the won ton wrappers, and place a small dish of water within reach.
  4. Pipe a dollop (approx. 1 heaping tablespoon) of the pumpkin filling into the center of each won ton wrapper. Dip your finger into the water dish, and swipe it around the entire edge of the wrapper. Then place another wrapper on top and press around the edges to seal. Repeat with each won ton square, working quickly so they don’t dry out.  Cover finished ravioli with a damp dish towel.
  5. Next, prepare the brown butter. Heat a medium pan over medium-high heat. Add the butter, and allow it to melt and foam. It will turn brown and nutty. Once the butter is brown, add the sage leaves, cooking quickly until they are crispy (1-2 minutes). Remove the sage leaves with a slotted spoon, and drain on a paper towel. Remove the butter from the heat, but keep warm near the stove.
  6. To cook the ravioli, bring a large pot of water to a boil, and drop the ravioli in in batches. It will cook quickly, in about 2-3 minutes. Once cooked, remove with a slotted spoon, and drain quickly on a paper towel.
  7. To serve, arrange the ravioli on a plate, drizzle with the brown butter, lightly sprinkle with parmesan, and top with a few of the crispy sage leaves.
Serves 5-6
 
 
Once you try these, I promise they will become your new favorite fall staple. The toasty brown butter, crispy sage, and creamy pumpkin filling are just too good to resist!  (PS…they freeze great as well so you can make batches ahead of time to store in your freezer).
pumpkin-ravioli-plated

 


The following two tabs change content below.
Erin Kennedy and I’m the Founder and Creative Director. I love food, cooking and learning tips in the kitchen and of course, eating. Sharing all this food love is a passion of mine.

Latest posts by Erin Kennedy (see all)

Comments

  1. Jennifer Helm-Coleman says:

    I’m so glad I came across your recipe, it sounds delicious and I’m looking forward to making them. I have a question though… My husband is very sensitive to sage, rosemary and basil – a little goes a looong way for him. Can I omit the sage, or does the dish really need the herbiness that it lends?

Add Your Comment

*

This blog is kept spam free by WP-SpamFree.